How to Settle Visitation Rights Amicably Between Conflicting Parties

A gavel and colourful letters regarding child-custody and family-law concept

How to Settle Visitation Rights Amicably Between Conflicting Parties

When parents are no longer together, it can be challenging to determine who should have custody of the children and what visitation rights should be granted to the other parent. In some cases, both parties may agree on a visitation schedule that works for them without having to go to court.

However, if you cannot reach an agreement, the court will decide based on what is in the child’s best interests. There are several things that you can do to try to settle visitation rights amicably between conflicting parties:

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Talk to each other

This is probably the most important thing that you can do. Sit down with your soon-to-be ex-spouse and talk to each other about what visitation schedule would work best for both of you. Be willing to compromise and be open to suggestions. Set aside your personal conflicts in the meantime to focus on your child.

What matters is that you both want the best for your child. This may be easier said than done, but it is definitely worth giving a shot. After all, you know your child better than anyone else, and you want what is best for them.

And when making a visitation schedule, it is crucial to consider your child’s age. A young child may not be able to handle long periods away from either parent, so a schedule that allows for more frequent visitation may be best.

On the other hand, an older child may be able to handle longer periods away and may even prefer it. Again, the most important thing is to talk to each other and try to develop a schedule that works best for both of you and your child.

Hire a mediator

If talking to your ex-spouse doesn’t seem to be getting you anywhere, you may want to consider hiring a mediator. Using divorce mediation services may help facilitate negotiations between the two of you and provide impartial advice.

This may be a good option if you feel like you and your ex-spouse are stuck in a rut and cannot agree on your own. Since a mediator is a neutral third party, they can help you both see the situation from a different perspective and may be able to offer some suggestions that you hadn’t considered before.

Of course, you will still need to agree on your own, but having a mediator there to help facilitate negotiations can be very helpful. So, if you’re having trouble agreeing, this may be an option worth considering.

Consider using a parenting plan

A parenting plan is a document that outlines the visitation schedule and other aspects of child custody, such as decision-making power and holiday schedules. Drawing up a parenting plan can be an excellent way to settle visitation rights between conflicting parties.

However, it is essential to note that a parenting plan is not legally binding and will not be enforced by the court. But it can still be a helpful tool to use as a guideline. If you and your ex-spouse cannot agree on your own, you may want to consider using a parenting plan as a starting point. This can help you both see what the other is thinking and may help you agree more easily.

Get help from a lawyer

If all else fails, you may want to consider getting help from a lawyer. A lawyer can help you understand your rights and give you advice on what to do next. They can also help you navigate the legal system and can represent you in court if necessary.

However, if you decide to go this route, be prepared to pay for it. Lawyers can be expensive, so you must weigh the cost versus the benefit. If you think that a lawyer may be able to help you settle visitation rights amicably between conflicting parties, then it may be worth considering.

In some cases, both parties may agree on a visitation schedule that works for them without having to go to court. However, if both parties cannot reach an agreement, the court will decide based on what is in the child’s best interests.

Going through a divorce is difficult enough, but it can be even more complicated when you have children. Determining custody and visitation rights can be a complex and emotional process. However, there are things that you can do to try to settle these issues amicably between conflicting parties.

Talk to each other, seek mediation, and be willing to compromise. If you are still unable to agree, the court will decide based on what is in the child’s best interests. At the end of the day, what matters is that you do what’s best for your child.

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